Good Teaching: The Top 10 Requirements — Michael Pyne

I’m a firm believer that a calendar year cannot be concluded without a slew of top 10 lists. Even Faculty Focus, an online website and e-newsletter dedicated to teaching in higher education, recently succumbed to the temptation of a top 10 of 2010. The two-part article entitled “Top 10 Faculty Focus Articles for 2010” Continue reading Good Teaching: The Top 10 Requirements — Michael Pyne

How Learning Works — Jane Holbrook

Paul blogged on Tuesday about a recent visitor to our campus, John Mighton, and recommended his book, “The End of Ignorance”. I’m going to continue the trend this week by suggesting another book, one that I’m finding really helpful. I became aware of it through the POD listserv (Professional and Organizational Development Network in Higher Education) and I received it recently as an interlibrary loan. We need a copy of this on our campus; I’m finding it to be an excellent resource. Continue reading How Learning Works — Jane Holbrook

Jane Holbrook

Jane Holbrook

As Senior Instructional Developer (Blended Learning), Jane Holbrook helps to develop faculty programming that promotes the effective use of the online environment in on-campus courses. Working closely with Faculty Liaisons, CEL (Centre for Extended Learning) and ITMS (Instruction Technologies and Multimedia Services), she helps manage initiatives related to “blended learning” courses. She received her BSc and MSc from Dalhousie University but has also studied Graphic Design at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design.

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Teaching in refugee camps: A Challenging or a Rewarding Experience? – Yueu Magot Majok

For the fifteen years I have been in Kakuma Refugee Camp in North Western Kenya, I was a student and I eventually became a teacher. During this period, I had a blend of many rewarding as well as challenging experiences about life as a student and as a teacher in a refugee camp. Many people have asked me questions such as “what do you think about teaching here and teaching in Kenya” and I usually don’t know where to begin. Perhaps you will get the answer to these questions when you read this blog. Continue reading Teaching in refugee camps: A Challenging or a Rewarding Experience? – Yueu Magot Majok

So students aren’t studying? — Michael K. Potter (University of Windsor)

Recently, an article from the Boston Globe, “What Happened to Studying?”  made the rounds, provoking sighs, laments and self-satisfied claims that the kids just aren’t as dedicated as they used to be.  We all know the drill.  According to the article, two researchers in California found that the number of hours students spend studying has been on the decline for fifty years – from 24 hours a week in 1961 to 14 hours a week now. Continue reading So students aren’t studying? — Michael K. Potter (University of Windsor)

Things I wish I had known my first year teaching – Veronica Brown

Last week, while dropping my children off at school, I watched as the junior kindergarten students arrived for their very first day of school. Most of them were ready to march right into school, a few were less excited. As I walked home, I passed the high school with a big sign that said, Continue reading Things I wish I had known my first year teaching – Veronica Brown

Veronica Brown

Veronica Brown

As Senior Instructional Developer, Curriculum & Quality Enhancement, Veronica Brown provides oversight and facilitative support for departmental and Faculty-wide curriculum planning initiatives. She also leads the development and implementation of the Centre’s assessment plan for understanding the impact and quality of our work.

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What I’ve Learned by Working with an Award-winning Teacher – Afsaneh Nabifar

The teaching practicum for UW’s Certificate in University Teaching (CUT) helped me enhance several of my teaching skills. Through this course, I got the chance to practice lecturing, receive feedback on my teaching skills, and become more self-aware and critically reflective of my teaching style. However, what made my experience special was the opportunity to work with a faculty member who is an award-winning teacher.  Professor Alex Penlidis was my observer and mentor Continue reading What I’ve Learned by Working with an Award-winning Teacher – Afsaneh Nabifar

Mark Morton

Mark Morton

As Senior Instructional Developer, Mark Morton helps instructors implement new educational technologies such as clickers, wikis, concept mapping tools, question facilitation tools, screencasting, and more. Prior to joining the Centre for Teaching Excellence, Mark taught for twelve years in the English Department at the University of Winnipeg. He received his PhD in 1992 from the University of Toronto, and is the author of four books: Cupboard Love; The End; The Lover's Tongue; and Cooking with Shakespeare.

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Add Sparkle to your Presentations and Lectures – Christine Jewell

ARTstor

ARTstor is a great source for images you can use to illustrate ideas and concepts.

Many will attest to the richness of the ARTstor database. A costume design researcher remarks:  “For costumes, the zoom feature lets you capture much more detail on the clothing than any book ever could” (e.g. Sarafan). Historians use ARTstor to locate primary source materials, such as this woodcut from 15th c. Germany. Continue reading Add Sparkle to your Presentations and Lectures – Christine Jewell