How to post

In order to post to the CTE blog, you must first obtain permission from the blog editor, Mark Morton.

If you haven’t yet registered, you can do so by clicking here. Then, to open a window where you can begin to write your post, click here — but before you do anything, please read the following guidelines. Thanks, Mark

  • Please put your name after the title of your posting — for example, “Clicker Use Among the Elderly – Mark Morton.”
  • Please insert a small and relevant image at the beginning of your post: it will help attract readers. Click here to do a special search in Flickr for images that are legally available for use according to a Creative Commons license.  If you’d rather have Mark do this for you, just email one or both of them.
  • Please select at least one category (from the right hand side of the editing screen) that applies to your post. If no relevant category exists, tell Mark or Trevor, and they will create it. Feel free, too, to add “tag” words (also on the right hand side) to help make your posting searchable. For example, if you write a posting about clickers, you could select “New Educational Technologies” as your category, and add “clickers” and “personal response systems” as your tags.
  • Please place a blank line between paragraphs, but don’t indent them.
  • Please embed any links that you include in your post. That is, rather than having a post that includes a long and ugly URL such as http://www.cajungrocer.com/fresh-foods-holiday-dishes-turducken-c-1_15_24.html , use the “link” icon (it looks like a chain link, at the top of the window where you’ll write your post), to embed that link: turducken .
Mark Morton

Mark Morton

As Senior Instructional Developer, Mark Morton helps instructors implement new educational technologies such as clickers, wikis, concept mapping tools, question facilitation tools, screencasting, and more. Prior to joining the Centre for Teaching Excellence, Mark taught for twelve years in the English Department at the University of Winnipeg. He received his PhD in 1992 from the University of Toronto, and is the author of four books: Cupboard Love; The End; The Lover's Tongue; and Cooking with Shakespeare.

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